Mark 13:14-27. Active 1 year, 10 months ago. Introduction. The calling of Levi is another incident that occurs as Jesus is moving (Mark 2:13-14). Scholars have different interpretations. then let them that be in Judea flee to the mountains—The ecclesiastical historian, Eusebius, early in the fourth century, tells us that the Christians fled to Pella, at the northern extremity of Perea, being "prophetically directed"—perhaps by some prophetic intimation more explicit than this, which would be their chart—and that thus they escaped the predicted calamities by which the nation was overwhelmed. Mark 13:14 draws on Daniel 9:27, 11:31 and 12:11 to interpret the Roman destruction of the temple as a signal that the community is to flee from Judea (where Mark’s community is probably located) to the mountains. This shows the English words related to the source biblical texts along with brief definitions. Some early Christians understood Jesus' prophecies as referring to the destruction of Jerusalem in 70 AD. Ask Question Asked 7 years, 1 month ago. Viewed 1k times 3. It is interesting that the whole incident described here essentially represents a trap. Jesus Predicts the Destruction of the Temple (Mark 13: 1-4) (Mark 12:1-12) Jesus’ prediction of the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem is one of the most important features in Mark’s gospel. Try this experiment: First, read Mark 13:1-2, 8, 14-22, 24-30. Luk 21:20 And when ye shall see Jerusalem compassed with ** armies ***, then know that the desolation thereof is nigh. This section treats the matter a little more directly, although the meaning of the passage is still debatable in terms of its logic. But when ye see the abomination of desolation standing where he ought not. Mark 13 is the thirteenth chapter of the Gospel of Mark in the New Testament of the Christian Bible.It contains Jesus' predictions of the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem and disaster for Judea, as well as his eschatological discourse. 3. We'll send you an email with steps on how to reset your password. Mark 13-14 New Living Translation (NLT) Jesus Speaks about the Future. Answer: What is the meaning of the abomination of desolation? 13:14-23. What does this verse really mean? (Read Mark 13:1-4) See how little Christ values outward pomp, where there is not real purity of heart. (19-23) Coming after the abomination of desolation: great tribulation. MARK 13:14. When Life Changes. — Mark 13:14-20 NLT. Scholars have different interpretations. This shows the English words related to the source biblical texts along with brief definitions. It did not fulfill its purpose, and as any diligent orchardist would do, Jesus simply eliminated an unproductive tree, not with an ax or a saw, but by faith. 13 As Jesus was leaving the Temple that day, one of his disciples said, “Teacher, look at these magnificent buildings! Jesus calls Levi while teaching a crowd (Mark 2:14), and Levi is initially seen “sitting at the tax booth.” His employment would make him a figure of contempt for many of his Galilean contemporaries. of Mark next introduced the second element of apocalyptic literature. Then let them that be in Judea flee to the mountains; they that are in Jerusalem, or in any of the cities and towns of Judea, let them make their escape, as soon as possible, to the mountainous parts of the country; where they may be more safe from, the devastations of the Roman army; See Gill on Matthew 24:16. It contains Jesus' predictions of the destruction of the Temple in Jerusalem and disaster for Judea, as well as his eschatological discourse. ii] The desolating sacrilege. The passage stresses the public nature of this summons. The passage stresses the public nature of this summons. [⇑ See verse text ⇑] "Abomination" is from the Greek root word bdelugma, which refers to a foul, detestable, blasphemous thing, such as an idol. This relates to the Gospel's authorship, which is believed to be based on the memories of the apostle Peter. “Flee to the mountains” means to leave any city or other heavily populated area as quickly as possible, and remain for some period of time in the ‘mountains’ or other area that has relatively few people. The sign is the presence of the desolating abomination (Mk 13:14; see Dn 9:27), i.e., of the Roman power profaning the temple. 2. the transfiguration (cf. Mark 13:24-37 The Deeper Meaning of Events Mark 13:24-37 - Pulling the Veil Aside. The issue of taxation has arisen obliquely already, in terms of the call narrative of Levi (Mark 2:13-17, see above). Jesus had uttered all His mind against the Jewish ecclesiastics, exposing their character with withering plainness, and denouncing, in language of awful severity, the judgments of God against them … Free Reading Plans and Devotionals related to Mark 13:14. Commentary on Mark 13:14-23 (Read Mark 13:14-23) The Jews in rebelling against the Romans, and in persecuting the Christians, hastened their own ruin apace. Home >> Bible Studies >> Mark Study >> Mark 13:14-27. Mark 14:24 Some manuscripts the new; Mark 14:27 Zech. 15 if a man is on the housetop, he must not come down or go inside to collect anything from his house; He had described the current situation in cryptic language. Textual witnesses. The original text was written in Koine Greek. Mark 14:24 Some manuscripts the new; Mark 14:27 Zech. Mark 13:14. Text. What does Mark 14:9 mean? But they will be completely demolished. Some scholars think that this passage links to Mark 14:28 and 16:7 so that the “mountains” refer to Galilee. Thank you for the A2A. Visit our library of inductive Bible studies for more in depth inductive studies on this and other books of the Bible you can use in your small group. Not one stone will be left on top of another!” Scholars have been sharply divided on how to deal with it: was it a genuine prediction, demonstrating Jesus’ power, or is it evidence that Mark was written after the Temple was destroyed in … Answer Save. Although Unleavened Bread is used here, Mark’s clear intention is the preparation for Passover (see notes on verse 1; Matt. He had described the current situation in cryptic language. He began to be sorely amazed; words not used in St. Matthew, but very full of meaning. What is the meaning of the abomination of desolation? 4 Answers. ii] The desolating sacrilege. Ellicott's Commentary for English Readers. Read Matt 24, Mar 13 & Luke 21 in parallel. Lv 4. John Trapp Complete Commentary. (Mark 10:13) The parents wanted Jesus to touch their little children and thereby place God’s blessing upon them. 13:14-23 The Jews in rebelling against the Romans, and in persecuting the Christians, hastened their own ruin apace. Prophecies concerning the kingdom of Israel, 13:1-37 . See Mark 10:13 (printed below) And they were bringing little children to him, so that he might touch them; but the disciples rebuked them. But when you shall see the abomination of desolation, spoken of by Daniel the prophet, standing where it ought not, (let him that reads understand,) then let them that be in Judaea flee to the mountains: Then let them, that be in Judea flee to the mountains, But for the elect’s sake, whom he hath chosen, through sanctification of the Spirit and belief of the truth; he hath shortened the days. The Gospel According To Mark. Source(s): TaZ. “Follow me,” Jesus told him, and Levi got up and followed him. 15:11. Entering the promised land, 11:1-16:20. 15), speaking of the Christians under Nero.

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